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Aug
23
2015

Hermeneutics 101, Part Three: The Bible is a Story that Points to Jesus + Love

Two weeks ago, I began a three-part seminar on hermeneutics, an introduction to biblical interpretation. Part One of the seminar was entitled, "The Bible is Alien to Us," and introduced participants to the translation process and comparing English translation approaches, introducing participants to the historical and cultural context of the Bible (i.e. the ancient Near East), and introducting participants to some of the literary elements of scripture (e.g. genre, metaphor, idiom, and myth).

Last week, I taught Part Two, entitled: "We Read the Bible Through Lenses," and introduced participants to Social Location and to a "Community Hermeneutic."

This week, I taught the third and final session of the seminar, entitled: "The Bible is a Story that Points to Jesus + Love." In this session, I introduced a Narrative approach to interpreting the Bible, a Greg Boyd's "Cruciform-centic hermeneutic," an ethical reading of the Bible (i.e. a "Hermeneutic of Love"), N. T. Wright's "Five-Act Model," William Webb's "Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic," and a hermeneutic I develop called, "Kingdom Air Hermeneutic."

For PDF versions of the manuscript and slides, see my Academia.edu account:

Hermeneutics 101, Part Three: The Bible is a Story that Points to Jesus + Love (Manuscript)
Hermeneutics 101, Part Three: The Bible is a Story that Points to Jesus + Love (Slides)

Enjoy!

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Aug
16
2015

Hermeneutics 101, Part Two: We Read the Bible Through Lenses

Last week, I began a three-part seminar on hermeneutics, an introduction to biblical interpretation. Part One of the seminar was entitled, "The Bible is Alien to Us," and introduced participants to the translation process and comparing English translation approaches, introducing participants to the historical and cultural context of the Bible (i.e. the ancient Near East), and introducting participants to some of the literary elements of scripture (e.g. genre, metaphor, idiom, and myth).

This week, I taught Part Two, entitled: "We Read the Bible Through Lenses," and introduced participants to Social Location and to a "Community Hermeneutic."

For PDF versions of the manuscript and slides, see my Academia.edu account:

Hermeneutics 101, Part Two: We Read the Bible Through Lenses (Manuscript)
Hermeneutics 101, Part Two: We Read the Bible Through Lenses (Slides)

Enjoy!

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Aug
11
2015

Hermeneutics 101, Part One: The Bible is Alien to Us

This week, I began a three-part seminar on hermeneutics, an introduction to biblical interptation. Part one of the seminar is entitled, "The Bible is Alien to Us," and has three parts: 1) Introducing participants to the translation process and comparing English translation approaches; 2) Introducing participants to the historical and cultural context of the Bible (i.e. the ancient Near East); 3) Introducting participants to some of the literary elements of scripture (e.g. genre, metaphor, idiom, and myth).

For PDF versions of the manuscript and slides, see my Academia.edu account:

  1. Hermeneutics 101, Part One: The Bible is Alien to Us (Manuscript)
  2. Hermeneutics 101, Part One: The Bible is Alien to Us (Slides)

Enjoy!

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Jul
27
2015

The Bible is Not a Database: 
A Brief Reflection on Biblical Interpretation 
in the Digital Age

A few years back, I misplaced something. Instead of thinking, “Where did I last see it?” I unconsciously thought, “I’ll just run a Spotlight search for it” ...as if every item in my house (and presumably the rest of my life) was indexed in Mac OS X.

That was the moment I realized using computers had literally changed the way I think.

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Jul
06
2015

Emotions, Intelligence, and the Vulnerability of God

It’s been quite a while since I’ve blogged here, but I’ve had a lot going on. I took a new ministry role requiring me to move from the East Coast to the West Coast; I’ve been serving as ‘solo pastor’ in my new role while the Lead Pastor is on sabbatical; and I finally graduated from seminary. So, yeah, I’ve been a little busy. But, I’m taking part of my precious day-off/sabbath to write a brief post on emotions, intelligence, and the vulnerability of God because these themes have come up in so much of my spiritual formation lately. I thought it would be beneficial to document some of my processing on these subjects.

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Mar
31
2015

Why Did Jesus Die? An Introduction to the Atonement

Last week I finished Part One of a new seminar called "Starting Points,"

"Christian faith does not require a person to check their brain at the door. No, Christian faith is strongest when one’s head and one’s heart are in agreement. We may not find all the answers for which we search, but there are some critical starting points in our quest."

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Mar
25
2015

Who is Jesus? A Historical and Theological Primer on the Identity of Jesus of Nazareth

I recently joined the pastoral staff of New City Church of Los Angeles, and one of my responsibilities is teaching a seminar on three of the most important questions about Christian faith: 1) Who is Jesus? 2) Why did he die? and 3) How can I trust the Bible?

We're calling the seminar Starting Points

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Dec
21
2014

10 Books I'm Reviewing in 2015

One of the best things about being a blogger is reviewing books. And if enough people visit your blog, authors and publishers will send you books to review! This is particularly great when the books that I'm sent are books I'm excited to read. The next crop of books I'm reading to review might be my best yet. So here are 10 books I'm reading (or have already read) to review in 2015:

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Dec
20
2014

Fighting the Virus of Classical Theism, Part 1: Richard Rice and The Openness of God's Bold Rejection of Divine Impassibility

Last month, I traveled to San Diego, CA for the annual conference of the American Academy of Religion and the Society of Biblical Literature. More specifically, I attended the SBL/AAR annual conference to present a response paper in the second session of the Open and Relational Theologies group, which was commemorating 20 years since the publishing of The Openness of God by Clark Pinnock, John Sanders, Richard Rice, William Hasker, and David Basinger. Three of the original authors of the book (John Sanders, Richard Rice, and David Basinger) were there in attendance and presented reflections on the last 20 years.

Why commemorate The Openness of God (OOG) 1? Because that book signaled a theological shift in U.S. American, evangelicalical theology that has very few parallels. It was a bold vision that made claims about God that were shocking to the evangelical theological establishment then and still shock many evangelicals today.

Part 1 of "Fighting the Virus of Classical Theism," will focus on the claims made by Richard Rice in the first chapter of OOG about God's emotional sensitivity and capacity for emotional change. These claims continue to be controversial even now.

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Nov
30
2014

Open Theism and the Millennial in the Pew: Evangelical Theology and Marketing in the Age of the World Wide Web

I’ve entitled my response “Open Theism and the Millennial in the Pew: Evangelical Theology and Marketing in the Age of the World Wide Web”. However, if you’ve paid any attention to religion blogs in the last two or three years, you might want to ask if there are in fact any evangelical Millennials left in the proverbial pew. Well, I assure you: ‘the rumors of our demise are greatly exaggerated.’ It may be true that Millennials aren’t the most enthusiastic generation when it comes to local church membership. But, due to the ubiquity of the Internet (and our vigorous use of it), it’s quite possible that evangelical Millennials are more theologically astute and active than any previous generation. I should say, too, that I do not intend to speak for all evangelical Millennials across the globe. I’m sure there are sociological considerations in South America, Africa, and Asia of which I’m unaware. So, consider my remarks indicative of a Western perspective in so far as Western evangelicalism differs from evangelicalism globally.

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Welcome to TheologicalGraffiti.com

Theological Graffiti is a blog written by T. C. Moore @tc_moore ...a Jesus-disciple, husband, father, Associate Pastor @NewCityChurch of Los Angeles, sometimes web designer, writer, and theology geek. For more about me, visit my Personal Website or my Online Profile. Otherwise, enjoy the graffiti.

Shalom,
T. C.

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